Feeding your Rabbit

There are no products matching the selection.

Feeding your Rabbit

Grass and Hay Water Greens Root Vegetables Fruit Nuggets and Pellets Treats Dangerous Foods Your rabbit will need a balanced diet to keep them happy and we have a useful guide to help you choose the healthiest and best foods available for your rabbit. How much do I feed my rabbit? Rabbits are grazers and will eat small amounts of food throughout their waking hours.  Rabbits are normally fed inside their hutches so that their food is kept dry and is readily available.  You can feed your rabbit in their run if the weather is fine and you may find your rabbit will take food from your hand. Rabbits need a constant supply of good quality hay or grass – in fact they need to eat a pile of hay at least the size of their own body every day! Feed your rabbit a handful of different greens daily. A handful of root vegetables can be fed twice a day. Rabbit nuggets and pellets should be fed daily – follow the guidelines on the packet as to recommended serving amounts.  If you have a large or giant rabbit (over 3.5kg) you should feed nuggets twice a day. See our Rabbits As Pets advice to learn more about different sizes and breeds of rabbits Muesli type foods can cause dental problems as rabbits will pick out the bits they like and leave the rest.  These bits left are usually the ones that contain fibre and your rabbit needs these to help wear down their teeth.  You might find it is easier to feed nuggets instead to make sure your rabbit gets enough fibre in their diet and keeps their teeth trim.   Fruit should be given in small amounts as treats. BackTo Top Grass and Hay A rabbits diet should consist of 80 – 90% grass or hay. Your rabbit needs to eat hay and grass to keep their teeth from becoming oversized and for their digestive system to work properly.  In the wild a rabbit will eat grass for 6 – 8 hours a day and Timothy Hay mixed with dandelions and marigolds is a good staple for your pet rabbit.  There are also a wide selection of hays and grasses available mixed with chamomile and herbs. To ensure that fresh hay is always available we recommend the use of hay racks, as well as using hay in litter trays and as bedding. Dont feed your rabbit lawnmower clippings as these can upset your rabbit’s digestive system and make them ill.  Be careful when giving your rabbit fresh handfuls of meadow grass as this could contain buttercups which are poisonous.   View our rabbit Product section for a selection of  nutritious hays and grasses for rabbits BackTo Top Water Always provide fresh clean drinking water for your rabbit and check the water supply each day. Make sure water does not freeze if your rabbit lives outdoors in winter. Visit our rabbit In Winter advice to learn more BackTo Top Greens Young rabbits can get stomach upsets and diarrhea from eating too many fresh greens so introduce them gradually as a treat.  Greens should never be fed in large quantities and have been washed before you feed them to your rabbits.  Green leafy plants recommended include:  dandelions, broccoli leaves and stems, turnip and beetroot tops, brussels sprouts, watercress, cabbage, celery, parsley, mint, chard, endive, radicchio, docks, chickweed and chicory.   Lettuce can be fed but only use romaine or dark leaf and not iceberg. BackTo Top Root Vegetables Root vegetables can be fed daily such as carrot (use sparingly as carrots are high in sugar), turnip and radish.  Potatoes, runner beans and peas should be avoided.   BackTo Top Fruit Fruit should be fed occasionally as a treat but always in small quantities as it is high in sugar.  Recommended fruits include:   apples, grapes (sparingly), pears, plums and strawberries. BackTo Top Nuggets and Pellets Nuggets and pellets are complementary foods that can provide your rabbit with vitamins, minerals and fibre.  They also help to keep your rabbits teeth trim.  Be careful not to over feed your rabbit on nuggets and pellets as they should not replace the hay that your rabbit needs.  There are specialist rabbit nuggets available that have been designed for particular breeds of rabbit to aid problems such as joint stiffness, digestive health, lack of energy and obesity. Visit our rabbit Health advice to learn more View our rabbit Product section for a selection of nuggets and pellets for rabbits BackTo Top Treats Some treats are high in sugar and should be given occasionally but there are a wide variety of treats that are based on bark, sticks, leaves and wood that your rabbit can enjoy on a regular basis.   View our rabbit Product section for a selection of rabbit treats BackTo Top Dangerous Foods Never feed your rabbit chocolate as it is toxic to most animals. Plants which are harmful to your rabbit if eaten include: amaryllis, anemone, azalea, bindweed, bracken, deadly nightshade, poppies, oak leaves, most evergreens, ragwort, rhubarb leaves, buttercups, daffodils, bluebells, foxgloves, mistletoe, dahlias, lupins, chrysanthemums, delphinium, lily of the valley, tulips, iris, lobelia, juniper, hyacinth, privet, yew, laburnum, ivy, rhododendron, wisteria, clematis, holly. If you suspect your rabbit has eaten any poisonous plants consult your vet immediately – and if you can collect a sample of the plant that they have eaten to help with the diagnosis. Call Vet Clinic at Petstop for a consultation BackTo Top