Playtime for your Rabbit

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Playtime for your Rabbit

Why play is good for rabbits Playtime for all Choosing the best toys for your rabbit Why play is good for rabbits Playing is very important for rabbits and they should be in a run or secure garden area for a minimum of 4 hours a day.  Rabbits enjoy playing with humans as well as each other and need toys and boredom breakers to keep their minds busy. They love to get lots of attention and stimulation and youll find that playtime keeps your rabbit happy, entertained and in good health – and you have fun too!  In fact play is essential to your rabbit’s well-being, gives them mental stimulation and exercise, and keeps them alert and trim.  The best times for playtime are the mornings and evenings as this is when rabbits are most active. Visit our Rabbit Products section for a wide range of suitable and safe toys for rabbits. BackTo Top Playtime for all Rabbits of all ages like to play but their exercise needs differ according to age, breed and whether or not they are neutered. Rabbits reach maturity somewhere between 6 and 10 months of age depending on the breed.  Generally rabbits are considered to be elderly at about 5 - 8 years old but different breeds of rabbit age more quickly than others.  The smaller breeds are longer lived, with most dwarf and small rabbits living on average 8 - 12 years. Medium sized breeds generally live around 6 - 8 years and the large and giant breeds tend to have the shortest lifespan at around 5 - 6 years. Young rabbits – young rabbits are full of energy and are more likely to chew the bars of their cage if they are bored. Older rabbits - senior rabbits are not as active and usually sleep more but still need regular work outs to prevent obesity. Large breeds – Large or giant breeds (such as the French Lop or the Giant Chinchilla) tend to be less energetic than small or dwarf breeds (such as the Dutch or the Dwarf Lop).  Large and giant rabbit breeds are prone to obesity and benefit from exercise but they are not as agile as smaller breeds and tend to suffer from joint and mobility problems. Neutered rabbits – Neutered or spayed rabbits slow down a little and put on weight more easily. Indoor only rabbits - It is important to ensure that rabbits kept indoors play outside as they do not use up the energy normally reserved for outdoor activities.  Exercise helps to prevent obesity. Playing games with your rabbit is a great way to prevent boredom and get to know them a bit better.  Your rabbit will play hide and seek with you, chase you, play with a football and play King of the Castle if you lie down!  Obstacle courses are great fun and you can create one in your garden out of tunnels and jumps. Visit our Rabbit Health Advice to learn more on obesity in rabbits.   Visit our Rabbit Products section for a wide range of suitable and safe toys for rabbits. BackTo Top Choosing the best toys for your rabbit The best toys for your rabbit can prevent boredom, discourage destructive behaviour, provide mental stimulation and keep them supple and agile.  Some rabbits enjoy throwing their toys around and up into the air so make sure the toys you choose are safe and have no sharp edges. Chasing and jumping – Rabbits love to run about and will chase balls and tug toys.  These are often made from wicker or rope which satisfies your rabbits need to chew.   Digging and burrowing – Tubes and tunnels are ideal for your rabbit as they recreate an underground environment. Chewing and gnawing – There are lots of chew toys for your rabbit to gnaw at and range from sticks, wood, fruit and vegetable chews, kongs and treat balls.  Your rabbit needs to chew to keep their teeth trim as their teeth do not stop growing. Visit our Rabbit Products section for a wide range of suitable and safe toys for rabbits Visit our Rabbit Health Advice to learn more about your rabbits teeth.   BackTo Top